Idiopathic Intussusception vs. Symptomatic Intussusception

Idiopathic Intussusception vs. Symptomatic Intussusception

Right picture: In this case, a so-called symptomatic intussusceptin due to a Meckelīs diverticulum is present. Left picture: Here, an acute idiopathic intussusception has occurred without a recognizable gross cause. A part of the appendix is visible above the terminal ileum (= ileocolic intussusception). In both types of intussusception a red current jelly stool may be observed; the disease starts with a sudden onset of colics and a palpable invagination tumor; in Meckelīs diverticulum, it is possible that due to a former combined ulcer at its border recurrent lower gastrointestinal bleedings and anemia can be found in the history.

In both cases, an intussusception is present at surgery. Right picture: The intussusception has been partially reduced from the intestinal segment on the right side of the picture; still, a dell remains on the tip of the appendage of the small intestine. Left picture: The terminal ileum is visible which is invaginated in the mobile cecum. The appendix is not involved. The described intussusception has led to a tumefaction of cecum.